Pinned An story/anecdote/quote every day

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    • When we were at war
      When we were at war
      There everyone used to think about their
      Beloveds or about their wives
      There everyone used to think about their
      Beloveds or about their wives

      And I could certainly think
      And I could certainly think
      About the times when I looked at a pipe
      In her blue smoke
      About the times when I looked at a pipe
      In her blue smoke

      Like when she lied to me sometimes
      Like when she lied to me sometimes
      But the his girl's heart gave love
      to someone else for a long time
      But the his girl's heart gave love
      to someone else for a long time

      But I didn't think about them at all,
      But I didn't think about them at all,
      I just smoked a pipe
      with bitter Turkish tobacco,
      I just smoked a pipe
      with bitter Turkish tobacco,

      I just shoot bullets faithfully
      I just shoot bullets faithfully
      hoping to appease my pain
      and to set a limit to our hostility
      hoping to appease my pain
      and to set a limit to our hostility

      When we will be at war,
      When we will be at war,
      to meet the bullets flying
      on our black horse
      to meet the bullets flying
      on our black horse

      But it looks like death it's not for me
      But it looks like death it's not for me
      and my black horse
      carries me away from the fire again
      and my black horse
      carries me away from the fire again

      Because my will is as strong as yours and my kingdom as great ...

      You have no power over me.
    • Spanish traditions unknown in the rest of Europe.

      Los Reyes Magos (Biblical Magi, or Three Wise Men, or Three Kings).

      From Wikipedia:

      "The biblical Magi[a] (/ˈmædʒaɪ/[1] or /ˈmeɪdʒaɪ/; singular: magus), also referred to as the (Three) Wise Men or (Three) Kings, were – in the Gospel of Matthew and Christian tradition – distinguished foreigners who visited Jesus after his birth, bearing gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. They are regular figures in traditional accounts of the nativitycelebrations of Christmas and are an important part of Christian tradition.
      Matthew is the only of the four canonical gospels to mention the Magi. Matthew reports that they came "from the east" to worship the "king of the Jews".[2] The gospel never mentions the number of Magi, but most western Christian denominations have traditionally assumed them to have been three in number, based on the statement that they brought three gifts.[3] In Eastern Christianity, especially the Syriac churches, the Magi often number twelve.[4] Their identification as kings in later Christian writings is probably linked to Psalm 72:11, "May all kings fall down before him.

      ...


      Spanish customs


      The Three Wise Men receiving children at a shopping centre in Spain. Letters with gift requests are left in the letterbox on the left-hand side.
      Western Christianity celebrates the Magi on the day of Epiphany, January 6, the day immediately following the twelve days of Christmas, particularly in the Spanish-speaking parts of the world. In these areas, the Three Kings (los Reyes Magos de Oriente, Los Tres Reyes Magos or simply Los Reyes Magos) receive letters from children and so bring them gifts on the night before Epiphany. In Spain, each one of the Magi is supposed to represent one different continent, Europe (Melchior), Asia (Caspar) and Africa (Balthasar). According to the tradition, the Magi come from the Orient on their camels to visit the houses of all the children, much like Sinterklaas and Santa Claus with his reindeer elsewhere, they visit everyone in one night. In some areas, children prepare a drink for each of the Magi. It is also traditional to prepare food and drink for the camels, because this is the only night of the year when they eat.
      In Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Paraguay and Uruguay, there is a long tradition for having the children receive presents by the three "Reyes Magos" on the night of January 5 (Epiphany Eve) or morning of January 6. Almost every Spanish city or town organises cabalgatas in the evening, in which the kings and their servants parade and throw sweets to the children (and parents) in attendance. The cavalcade of the three kings in Alcoy claims to be the oldest in the world, having started in 1886. The Mystery Play of the Three Magic Kings is also presented on Epiphany Eve. There is also a "Roscón" (Spain) or "Rosca de Reyes" (Mexico) as explained below.
      In the Philippines, beliefs concerning the Three Kings (Filipino: Tatlóng Haring Mago, lit. "Three Magi Kings"; shortened to Tatlóng Harì or Spanish Tres Reyes) follows Hispanic influence, with the Feast of the Epiphany considered by many Filipinos as the traditional end of their Christmas season. The tradition of the Three Kings' cabalgada is today done only in some areas, such as the old city of Intramuros in Manila, and the island of Marinduque. Another dying custom is children leaving shoes out on Epiphany Eve, so that they may receive sweets and money from the Three Kings. With the arrival of American culture in the early 20th century, the Three Kings as gift-givers have been largely replaced in urban areas by Santa Claus, and they only survive in the greeting "Happy Three Kings!" and the surname Tatlóngharì. The Three Kings are especially revered in Gapan, Nueva Ecija, where they are enshrined as patron saints in the National Shrine of Virgen La Divina Pastora.[citation needed]
      In Paraguay, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, children cut grass or greenery on January 5 and put it in a box under their bed for the Kings' camels. Children receive gifts on January 6, which is called Día de Reyes, and is traditionally the day in which the Magi arrived bearing gifts for the Christ child. Christmas starts in December and ends in January after Epiphany, although in Puerto Rico there are eight more days of celebration (las octavitas).

      ...


      Roscón de Reyes


      In Spain and Portugal, a ring-shaped cake (in Portuguese: bolo-rei[75]) contains both a small figurine of one of the Magi (or another surprise depending on the region) and a dry broad bean. The one who gets the figurine is "crowned" (with a crown made of cardboard or paper), but whoever gets the bean has to pay the value of the cake to the person who originally bought it. In Mexico they also have the same ring-shaped cake Rosca de Reyes (Kings Bagel or Thread) with figurines inside it. Whoever gets a figurine is supposed to organize and be the host of the family celebration for the Candelaria feast on February 2".




      Because my will is as strong as yours and my kingdom as great ...

      You have no power over me.
    • New

      Why study mathematics in high school if they do not help me when I go to the supermarket?

      The course has just started, a teacher asks his students to define what mathematics is. The students are between 12 and 18 years old, that is, they have been studying a subject called "Mathematics" for at least 8 years.

      The few brave who dare to respond do not hesitate to define what we call "The mathematics of the supermarket", that is, everything related to when you go to the purchase: control what is spent, that the cashier gives us the right change, compare prices ...

      Clearly students believe that mathematics is to do accounts and that they only serve for that. Well, to be honest, this is called arithmetic and it is undoubtedly one of the most important branches of our science, but something is wrong if it is the only one that reaches the students when, in truth, we have a tool such as our calculator. smartphone that makes it faster and more secure than us.

      So if a smartphone is able to replace the mathematics we study in the institute ... why do we study them?.

      I go further. Why do we study polynomials, derivatives, functions, statistical distributions, inversely proportional distributions ... if we are never going to use them in a supermarket? The school is supposed to teach us useful things for our lives, right?.

      The answer is simple, although there are still many people who do not see it (or do not want to see it): Mathematics teach us to think.

      Yes, yes, that is the great tool that mathematics brings to humanity. And is that by doing mathematics we learn to be critical, to not believe the first thing they tell us, to need a demonstration to trust us, to be more effective, to reflect a moment before making a decision or taking a step and, of course, to solve problems that are not necessarily of the type "John has 3 apples and eats 2 ...".

      That's why mathematicians are fashionable and do not have unemployment, because companies value that everything they do contains a solid and real base underneath.

      You see, a mathematized society will be harder to cheat ... maybe that's why it does not matter.

      Do you still wonder what mathematics are for?.

      Because my will is as strong as yours and my kingdom as great ...

      You have no power over me.